John Graham (born 1810) was the oldest child of William Graham and Sarah Jacobs-Graham.  He was married to Mary Jane Unknown (born 1810) and they settled in Carvers Creek Community of Bladen County, North Carolina.  Many of their offspring today continue to live in the communities of Carvers Creek, East Arcadia, Buckhead, Garland, Bolivia and Council, North Carolina.  It is believed that both John and Mary Jane are buried on or near John’s family land.   It is also believed that the Graham early stronghold and land purchased in the 1800’s by his mother Sarah is now just a wooded area north of the Buckhead Community, south of the Youngstown Community, and west of the East Arcadia. Many of their children and offspring identify themselves as either African-American or Native-American. (Of the 5 Waccamaw Siouan Indian Tribe Chiefs 2 were great-grand children of John & Mary Jane Graham. One of their son’s John N. Graham born about 1834 left his wife and three children in Bladen County around the 1860’s and arrived in Robeson County, North Carolina there he married at least twice. First to Gainor Locklear-Graham (1839-1890) and second he married Beadie Locklear-Graham born about 1857 most of their descendants are members of the Lumbee Indian Tribe. 
James Graham  (born 1814) married Winnie Blanks (1824 – 1913).  Winnie was the daughter of Alfred Blanks, Sr. (born 1774) and the grand-daughter of John Blanks (born 1754) whom appeared in the first United States Federal Census in Bladen County North Carolina in 1790 as a free person of color.  In 1774, John Blanks was granted 100 acres of land in Bladen County, North Carolina by the King of England.  Records indicate that John Blanks later sold that land and it is believed that he moved to Robeson County, North Carolina where many of his offspring are part of the Lumbee Indian tribe.  James and Winnie raised their family in East Arcadia/San Domingo, North Carolina.  Many of the Grahams’ in East Arcadia, Bolton, Freeman, Whiteville, Chadbourn, Clarkton and Riegelwood, North Carolina descend from them.  By trade, James was a noted cooper.  As such, Graham Chapel AME Zion Church is believed to have been named after him for his hard work as one of the builders as well as one of the founders and an original trustee member of the church.  Their children married many of the local families such as the Lacewells’, Blanks’, Robesons’, Millers, Moores’, and several others.  They identify themselves with the Black community or Native American community.  While we have not located James’ official burial site, it is believed that he is buried at Graham Chapel AME Zion Church, the church he pioneered.  His wife, Winnie Blanks-Graham is buried in the family graveyard located on the Graham Chapel AME Zion Church property.   

*NOTE:  One of James and Winnie’s children, Melvin William Graham born in 1865 was named after his grand-father William Graham, Sr.   Melvin married Georgian A. Unknown who was born in Georgia.  Melvin and Georgian raised their children, Alice, Rosa Lee, Arizona, Theodore & Philip either in Alabama or Georgia.
Elizabeth Graham-Bowen-Freeman (1819 – 1911) was married at least twice.  She first married Henry Bowen born in 1812 and later married an unknown Freeman and settled her family on the family land near East Arcadia/ San Domingo which is located in Bladen County, North Carolina.  Elizabeth was one of the major care-givers to her elderly mother, Sarah (age 78 at that time), as the 1860 United Federal Census indicates that she was living with her daughter Elizabeth.   Elizabeth’s burial site is clearly marked at the family cemetery at Graham Chapel AME Zion Church.  Many of her offspring live in the East Arcadia, Bolton, and Buckhead communities and have married local families such as the Blanks, Jacobs, and several others.
Joseph Graham (born 1827) married Margaret Young (born 1836).  Margaret was the daughter of Isaac Young (1797-1860) and Elizabeth Young (born 1793).  They settled and raised their family in Bladen County, North Carolina.  It is believed that both Joseph and Margaret are buried on Joseph’s homestead and/or in the historical Gum Swamp Grave-yard located in Bolton, North Carolina.  Joseph and Margaret’s grand-daughter, Rena Sophia Graham-Freeman married the first chief of the newly formed Waccamaw Siouan Indian Tribe, William James Freeman.  Their other daughter Lummie Graham (born 1885-1969) married David James Jacobs (born 1875-1962).  Many of their children married and continue to live in the Buckhead community and are part of the Waccamaw Siouan Indian Tribe.  Many also identify themselves as part of the African-American Community.  Their children married local families such as the Jacobs, Freemans, Patricks, and several others. (Of the 5 Waccamaw Siouan Indian Tribe Chiefs 3 were great-grand children of Joseph & Margaret Young-Graham)
Margaret “Peggy” Graham-Baldwin (born 1827) married Mathew Baldwin (born 1825).  They settled in the Carvers Creek area of North Carolina, Margaret’s homestead.  The two of them appear together in the 1900 US Federal Census living in Bladen County, North Carolina.  Most of their descendants live in the present day Buckhead Community and are members of the Waccamaw Siouan Indian Tribe.  Their children married local families such as the Skippers, Jacobs, Locklears, Patricks, and several others. (Of the 5 Waccamaw Siouan Indian Tribe Chiefs 2 were great-grand children of Margaret Graham & Mathew Baldwin)
Henry Graham (born 1830) married Lucy Blanks (born 1831), who was also a daughter of *Alfred Blanks, (born 1774).  It is said that Alfred Blanks Sr. is credited as being the father of nearly all of the Blanks in both Bladen County and Columbus County, North Carolina.  Henry settled and raised his family on or near his homestead property in the Youngstown community of Bladen County, North Carolina.  It is believed that both Henry and Lucy are buried on this land.  It is also told by family members that their graves were in the Youngstown community of Bladen County, North Carolina, but did not have stone markers to identify their burial site.  Their burial sites were marked with glass jar markers which has obviously been damaged over the years by farming equipment and other acts of nature.  Many of Henry and Lucy children married local families such as the Freemans, Jacobs, Youngs, Blanks, Rhodes, Lacewells, and several others.   Their son, William (born 1851-1924) married Isadora Jacobs (born 1888-1938) and raised his family in the Waccamaw Siouan Indian community of Buckhead, North Carolina.    Their other offspring also identify with either their Native- American or African–American origin.  


*Note:   Alfred Blanks, Sr. is also the father of Winnie Blanks.  Winnie Blanks is the wife of Henry’s brother James Graham.  

*Note:  Henry Graham born 1872, one of Henry and Lucy’s children, moved to Florida and married Victoria Porter who was born in 1884 in Florida.  Henry and Victoria raised their children, Cora Lee, Henry, Dessie, Robert, Clifford, John, Willie, and Walter in the Flemington, Marion area of Florida.  

William “Jack” Graham Jr. (born 1836) was the youngest of William and Sarah Jacobs-Graham’s children.  He married Ann Eliza Moore (born 1834) and they settled their family in the Carvers Creek area of Bladen County, North Carolina.  As the state of North Carolina was changing its’ county boundaries, the family ended up on the Columbus county side in what is the present day St. James community. The vast majority of Jack and Ann Eliza’s offspring continue to identify with their Native American origin and is part of the Waccamaw Siouan Indian tribe of Bladen County and Columbus County, North Carolina.  It is believed that both William “Jack” Jr. and wife, Anne Eliza’s final resting place is located at one of the oldest graveyards in Bladen County for free persons of color known as Blanks Graveyard which is located in Council, North Carolina.  It is also believed that the Blanks Graveyard is an original Blanks-Mitchell cemetery named after Alfred Blanks, Sr.’s son, Elijah Blanks (born 1808) and his wife  Elenorah Mitchell-Blanks (born 1815).  It is also home to many of the early free families of color prior to the Emancipation Proclamation such as the Spauldings, Freemans, Jacobs, Mitchells, Youngs and several others.  Jack and Anna Eliza’s children married many local families from both Bladen County and Columbus County , North Carolina such as the Spauldings, Mitchells, Blanks, Meares, Burneys, Thompsons, and several others.
UNDER REVIEW/FURTHER RESEARCH REQUIRED

It is believed, however, research is still under way to determine if Sarah Young (born 1832) could also be a child of William and Sarah Jacobs-Graham or Alfred Blanks Sr.  Sarah Young is the wife of Moses Young (born 1816).  Moses Young and James Graham were two of the three original Founders and Trustee members of Graham Chapel Church in 1874.  The third Founder/Trustee Member was John Blanks (1839 – 1910).  John Blanks is the Nephew–in-law of both James Graham and Henry Graham.  Of note, John Blanks is also the son of Alfred Blanks, Jr. (born 1820) and grandson to Alfred Blank Sr. (born 1774).  John Blanks was named after his great grandfather John Blanks Sr. (born 1754) and is buried at Graham Chapel AME Zion Church and it is believed that Moses Young is also buried there along with many other descendants of the Young clan.  Many of the offspring of Sarah and Moses Young married local families such as the Grahams, Blanks, and several others.  They continue to live in the Youngstown, East Arcadia, Buckhead, Riegelwood, and Bolton communities.

Their Children
Elizabeth Graham-Bowen-Freeman (1819-1911) Headstone
Courtesy of Kevin E. Graham all right reserved
Winnie Blanks-Graham (1824-1913) Headstone
Courtesy of Kevin E. Graham all right reserved
John Blanks (1839-1910) Headstone
Courtesy of Kevin E. Graham all right reserved
The Descendants of William and Sarah Jacobs-Graham